Ahvahtlom
occupyallstreets:

CISPA Replaces SOPA As Internet’s Enemy No. 1 (Must Read)
The Internet has a new enemy. The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2011 (CISPA), also known as H.R. 3523, is a “cybersecurity” bill in the House of Representatives. While CISPA does not focus primarily on intellectual property (though that’s in there, too), critics say the problems with the bill run just as deep. 
As with SOPA and PIPA, the first main concern about CISPA is its “broad language,” which critics fear allows the legislation to be interpreted in ways that could infringe on our civil liberties. The Center for Democracy and Technology sums up the problems with CISPA this way:

    •    The bill has a very broad, almost unlimited definition of the information that can be shared with government agencies notwithstanding privacy and other laws;    •    The bill is likely to lead to expansion of the government’s role in the monitoring of private communications as a result of this sharing;    •    It is likely to shift control of government cybersecurity efforts from civilian agencies to the military;    •    Once the information is shared with the government, it wouldn’t have to be used for cybesecurity, but could instead be used for any purpose that is not specifically prohibited.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) adds that CISPA’s definition of “cybersecurity” is so broad that “it leaves the door open to censor any speech that a company believes would ‘degrade the network.’”
Moreover, the inclusion of “intellectual property” means that companies and the government would have “new powers to monitor and censor communications for copyright infringement.”
Furthermore, critics warn that CISPA gives private companies the ability to collect and share information about their customers or users with immunity — meaning we cannot sue them for doing so, and they cannot be charged with any crimes.
According to the EFF, CISPA “effectively creates a ‘cybersecurity’ exemption to all existing laws.”

“There are almost no restrictions on what can be collected and how it can be used, provided a company can claim it was motivated by ‘cybersecurity purposes.’” the EFF continues.
“That means a company like Google, Facebook, Twitter, or AT&T could intercept your emails and text messages, send copies to one another and to the government, and modify those communications or prevent them from reaching their destination if it fits into their plan to stop cybersecurity threats.”

Read the full text of CISPA here, or the full official summary at the bottom of this page.
Read More
SIGN THE PETITION TO SAVE THE INTERNET FROM CISPA

occupyallstreets:

CISPA Replaces SOPA As Internet’s Enemy No. 1 (Must Read)

The Internet has a new enemy. The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2011 (CISPA), also known as H.R. 3523, is a “cybersecurity” bill in the House of Representatives. While CISPA does not focus primarily on intellectual property (though that’s in there, too), critics say the problems with the bill run just as deep. 

As with SOPA and PIPA, the first main concern about CISPA is its “broad language,” which critics fear allows the legislation to be interpreted in ways that could infringe on our civil liberties. The Center for Democracy and Technology sums up the problems with CISPA this way:

    •    The bill has a very broad, almost unlimited definition of the information that can be shared with government agencies notwithstanding privacy and other laws;
    •    The bill is likely to lead to expansion of the government’s role in the monitoring of private communications as a result of this sharing;
    •    It is likely to shift control of government cybersecurity efforts from civilian agencies to the military;
    •    Once the information is shared with the government, it wouldn’t have to be used for cybesecurity, but could instead be used for any purpose that is not specifically prohibited.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) adds that CISPA’s definition of “cybersecurity” is so broad that “it leaves the door open to censor any speech that a company believes would ‘degrade the network.’”

Moreover, the inclusion of “intellectual property” means that companies and the government would have “new powers to monitor and censor communications for copyright infringement.

Furthermore, critics warn that CISPA gives private companies the ability to collect and share information about their customers or users with immunity — meaning we cannot sue them for doing so, and they cannot be charged with any crimes.

According to the EFF, CISPA “effectively creates a ‘cybersecurity’ exemption to all existing laws.”

There are almost no restrictions on what can be collected and how it can be used, provided a company can claim it was motivated by ‘cybersecurity purposes.’” the EFF continues.

That means a company like Google, Facebook, Twitter, or AT&T could intercept your emails and text messages, send copies to one another and to the government, and modify those communications or prevent them from reaching their destination if it fits into their plan to stop cybersecurity threats.

Read the full text of CISPA here, or the full official summary at the bottom of this page.

Read More

SIGN THE PETITION TO SAVE THE INTERNET FROM CISPA

also

JUST BECAUSE I AM NOT OUTSIDE AND IN TOWN, DOES NOT MEAN I DO NOT SUPPORT THE ANTI-ACTA MOVEMENT HAPPENING GLOBALLY TODAY. DUE TO HOW FUCKING POOR I AM, I COULDN’T VINDICATE GOING OUT TO OWN JUST TO PROTEST.

"Here is another art piece related to the behaviour the USA have since the early 2012. I  searched for a long time the right way to depict what i felt and I  finally managed to reach that by making a mashup between the Nazi flag  and the US flag.I am sure that this will raise some controversy  but hell, it seems that it’s going in that direction : cops in full riot  gear brutally dispatching peaceful protesters, cops tasing unarmed  persons just because htey acted a bit aggressively while being evacuated  or spraying straight in the face peaceful manifestants, well I’m sorry,  but these are totalitarian measures. In addition of that there’s Kim  Dotcom’s arrest who wasn’t even on the US soil and who got arrested  anyway. This is again a totalitarian measure ( remember the deportation  of Jews by Nazi germany from France or other countries ? Well it’s  moretheless the same thing but for a single person - so far.So  if you share my views I encourage you to repost this or to modify it as  much as you feel ( motivational poster, Y U NO guy memes and so on ) to  spread the word and show to the masses that if this keeps on going like  this, we’re going straight towards confrontation, and that if we don’t  do anything we’re gonna be crushed like nothing because of money greedy  people and the will of control over everything and everyone of others.PS: the Nazi-ish flag text says in Latin “Join us or perish”.”

"Here is another art piece related to the behaviour the USA have since the early 2012.
I searched for a long time the right way to depict what i felt and I finally managed to reach that by making a mashup between the Nazi flag and the US flag.

I am sure that this will raise some controversy but hell, it seems that it’s going in that direction : cops in full riot gear brutally dispatching peaceful protesters, cops tasing unarmed persons just because htey acted a bit aggressively while being evacuated or spraying straight in the face peaceful manifestants, well I’m sorry, but these are totalitarian measures. In addition of that there’s Kim Dotcom’s arrest who wasn’t even on the US soil and who got arrested anyway. This is again a totalitarian measure ( remember the deportation of Jews by Nazi germany from France or other countries ? Well it’s moretheless the same thing but for a single person - so far.

So if you share my views I encourage you to repost this or to modify it as much as you feel ( motivational poster, Y U NO guy memes and so on ) to spread the word and show to the masses that if this keeps on going like this, we’re going straight towards confrontation, and that if we don’t do anything we’re gonna be crushed like nothing because of money greedy people and the will of control over everything and everyone of others.

PS: the Nazi-ish flag text says in Latin “Join us or perish”.”

niuniente:

jasminumodyssey:

digiportplz:

cartoonfanatic:

niklauz:

stormofthunder:

“From what I can tell it’s even LESS known than ACTA. I haven’t even been able to find any YouTube videos on it.

Here are two lovely quotes I think you will find interesting:

“A leaked version of the February 2011 draft U.S. TPP Intellectual Property Rights Chapter indicates that U.S. negotiators are pushing for the adoption of copyright measures far more restrictive than currently required by international treaties, including the controversial Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement.”

“The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative is pursuing a TPP agreement that will require signatory counties to adopt heightened copyright protection that advances the agenda of the U.S. entertainment and pharmaceutical industries, but omits the flexibilities and exceptions that protect Internet users and technology innovators.”

Yep, more restrictive than ACTA.

Countries will be forced to rewrite their copyright laws and adopt this agreement’s (beyond sucky) laws.

I don’t really know much about this myself, but here are a few points summarized from the article:
-Temporary reproductions of copyrighted works without permission will count as infringement. (So I’m guessing you can’t put your music on an external drive if you’re getting a new computer?)
-Countries can’t import legitimate goods without copyright owner approval. (So basically Japan could say that USA is no longer allowed to import anime.)
-Extend the Life+70 years copyright in individual work, and the 95 years after publication/120 years for corporation stuff.
-Ban circumvention of digital locks. (DMCA is a whole host of issues in and of itself.)
-“Adopt criminal sanctions for copyright infringement that is done without a commercial motivation.” (Pretty self-explanatory there.)
-“Adopt the U.S. DMCA Internet Intermediaries copyright safe harbor regime in its entirety. This would require Chile to rewrite its forward-looking 2010 copyright law that currently provides for a judicial notice and takedown regime, which provides greater protection to Internet users’ expression and privacy than the DMCA’s copyright safe harbor regime.” (Couldn’t have said it better myself.)” - WindieDragon

Mother of fucking god, I am seriously getting tired of the fucking US continuously fucking trying to fuck shit up by making so much fucking shit and caring so fucking much about fucking copyright and fucking intellectual fucking properly fucking problems when there are so many other fucking much more fucking important fucking problems that have to be fucking taken fucking care of. Fuck.

I don’t fucking care if this will fucking fill my fucking fuck quota of the fucking month, holy fucking shit balls on a dick.

I don’t fucking even fucking FUCK.

Just spread this shit. Just fucking do it.

What the fucking fuck, can’t they fucking give the internet a fucking break?!

>: I have no response to express my anger

alkhdicnlyvblvbyjkagfjagJGFLAKFHAKFHLKFKHSSLJLAKH FS LKHSLKJGFJKSHFJKSDGFHSG?!?!?!?!?!?!?!

HOLY FUCK IT’S LIKE IT KEEPS DIGIVOLVING.

GAAAH

WHAT THE ACTUAL FUCK?

If this is true I don’t know what the hell had stroke on people lately…! Just. Please. No. I think there are more major issues in the world than copyright issues (which are important but not as major for the planet than, let’s say over-population, which we already have here). 
So, countries. Please deal with more severe problems first and leave the internet be. 

winglesshunter:

fudgingpie:

lintufriikki:

bb1494:

friendlyneighborhooddeliveryman:

zip-your-howling-screamer:

fastest-boy-alive:

marcelinedrawsooo:

please, everybody take a moment to sign this!

((IF EVERYONE SIGNS 10 TIMES MINIMUM, GUYS

WE CAN GET OVER 500 SIGNATURES IN ONE NIGHT

REBLOG REBLOG REBLOG AND SIGN SIGN SIGN))

[[EVERYONE DO THIS. OMFG PLEASE. *HYPERVENTILATES*

((BUMPING AGAIN, AND SIGNING IT AGAIN.))

SIGNAL BOOST. THIS NEEDS TO BE REBLOGGED. SPREAD THIS LIKE WILDFIRE. FUCKING DO IT. IF NOT THEN KISS THE INTERNET GOODBYE BECAUSE WHEN ACTA GOES LIVE THE INTERNET AS WE KNOW IT WILL BE FUCKING DESTROYED.

holy shit why doesn’t this have more notes… everyone, please. it still needs 6,000 signatures. and there’s not much time.

ONLY NEED ABOUT 3,500 MORE SIGNATURES GUYS - COME ON… GET SIGNING!!! THIS AFFECTS EVERYONE EVERYWHERE OF EVERY FANDOM OR EVEN NON-FANDOM, SOMETHING WE ALL NEED TO PULL TOGETHER ABOUT!!!!

New goal, guys, we’re about 20K out from our goal of 250K. Please reblog like crazy and sign if you haven’t already!

In December of 2011, it was reported by Digital Music News that the creators of MegaUpload were rolling out plans for a new cloud based music service that had the potential to change the music industry.

Called Megabox, it would have created an alternative to record labels as a means for artists to sell their music on-line, cut out the middle man and allow artists to keep 90 percent of their earnings.

They were also going to have a program called Megakey that allowed artists to offer their music free and still generate revenue.

This came just a week or so after Universal filed to have a promotional video by Megaupload removed from youtube that featured A list artists, that Universal had absolutely no claim to.

Was Megaupload taken down because it was a threat to an existing business model, that makes a lot of people a lot of money?

It’s starting to look that way.

Also, for your reading enjoyment, here is an interview with the founder of Megaupload concerning the youtube video take down, and his previous problems with Universal.

Sources:

Mystery surrounds Universal’s takedown of Megaupload YouTube video on C|NET

MegaUpload Is Now Launching a Music Service Called MegaBox… on Digital Music News

Post on google plus by Shauna Myers “Why was MegaUpload really shut down?”

Whoa there, guys. The US petition has a FRACTION of what it should (2.5K of the 30K it needs).

BOOST THE DAMN SIGNAL

ACTA petition. Sign and reblog like crazy.

internet-justice:

harmonyshipper:

internet-justice:

ACTA has already been signed by several countries, but if we can get the European Parliament to vote no, it can be dismantled and sent back.

Sign here

 REBLOG! REBLOG! REBLOG!

 We got this. Keep it circulating!

We’re less than 5k from our first goal of 50k! Add your vote and tell the world that we will not accept the rape of the internet!

tallix:

tenicola:

whotisthis:

cupcakeforger:

kenrics:

everythingcomingupkarommel:

thereichenbachfinn:

alpacas-with-top-hats:

fannishminded:

thisisnotbruce:

A more-detailed explanation of ACTA

WATCH THIS. Just watch.

WATCH.

THIS IS LAST ENEMY.

This is V for Vendetta, this is EVERY big brother horror story, every dark future written by any author, imagined by any artist… and it’s happening now.

Sorry to flood your dashes but we need to get educated, get signing and get awareness… Wiki and Reddit and everyone need to do for Acta what we did for Sopa.

I would be really happy if people from all around the world would react to this like SOPA. I mean, I protested against SOPA even though I’m in the UK and so it technically wouldn’t affect me. So, I would be overjoyed if ACTA would stir up the same reaction as the SOPA and PIPA.

Watch and spread the word. ACTA is scary as fuck.

Oh my god.

Basically every popular website will be affected. Tumblr would become useless… and perhaps Facebook too… and so many others.

They might as well delete the internet as a whole.

We have to fight.

Sign every single petition, tell all of your friends and family. Do everything you can to stop this misleading organistion.

oh fuck no.

This is insane…. 8|

Holy shit |||||||| J-just watch this guys asjdlkdsf—

SERIOUSLY. who fucking comes up with these ideas. Why dont they just DELETE THE INTERNET while they’re at it???

Seriously.

apriki:

I think it’s amazing, tbqh. I think that Anonymous embodies everything the power of the internet can be and turns it into a weapon for defending free speech, which is, at the end of the day, censorship of anything on the web is aiming to destroy.
Consider this: we are the first generation to truly have been raised in a digital world. For most of us, there is nothing scary or confusing or uncomfortable about sitting down in front of a computer and googling something or just making our way around the internet. Our view and our impact aren’t limited to our local community or area - thanks to the internet, our social circles and our perspective is worldwide. Have you ever spoken to someone you’ve never met, who lives half a world away? That’s the power of the internet: a global communication system that lets you connect instantly to people whose experiences and lives are drastically different to yours.
In the 1450’s, the Gutenberg press was created, and it changed the world because for the first time ever, widespread populations were learning to read and to understand, and began interpreting the Bible for themselves instead of listening to the church. This lead to schisms in Christianity that are still fought over today - all because the masses, for the first time, had the change to become informed for themselves. Do you know what the Internet gives us? It gives us knowledge, and that will get you further than anything else in the world. God, how could you not want to know? How could you not want to be on the web everyday, learning and understanding? Everything is accesible to you at the click of a button, and that’s not only revolutionary, it’s neccessary. 
People should not be censored by their governments. They should be given the choice and the opportunity to educate themselves, and the internet gives them that chance. People should be able to choose what media they’re going to consume, and when, and how; and not feel ostracised because of their geographic location, because the internet eliminates that factor. Internet users know this. File sharing sites know this. For some reason, governments and corporate businesses seem to have missed the message.
The fact remains that the entertainment industry is centered on the United States, and the rest of the world is secondary to that. In most countries there is no Netflix or direct streaming of television shows (and where they are present the shows usually have a delay by one or two seasons from when they air in America), and the shows that air are a limited and controlled sampling of the full scope. There is no fast, cheap and reliable way to download or stream these shows from websites or programs (attempting to stream from sites like ABC or Hulu outside of the US ends with a “this video is not available in your country” notice) - if you are not in the US, there is basically nothing for you. Unless, of course, you torrent or download - the companies who own television shows don’t think they’re going to make a profit in your country, so you’d probably never get to see them otherwise.
Basically, the entertainment industry is constantly and repeatedly telling me that my worth as a consumer is less than an American because I am not as geographically desirable. Even on the internet - which transcends national boundaries - I am not allowed to view things because I am not an American. Do you know what I think about that? I think it’s bullshit. 
I think that everyone, everywhere is an equal consumer. I think that we should all be given the choice to engage with media, to educate ourselves, to learn and experience what the world has to offer us. I think that the government won’t let me do that, and corporate industry doesn’t want me to do that, and that the internet is quite possibly one of the only places in the world where free speech is given free reign, and that’s beautiful.

We don’t vote in entertainment companies or business CEO’s, and yet they decide what we hear, what we see, what’s good for us and what isn’t. We don’t decide what ads we see or how people are represented in them; we aren’t given a say in the fact that the make up industries of the world make a profit out of attempting to keep women in a state of shame over their own bodies, or that people of color and non-heterosexuals and those who do not adhere to the gender binary are barely represented at all in any media. I think that all these groups - that all groups, everywhere - have an opportunity to gather and connect and learn on the internet. And I think the fact that governments and industries want to stamp that out so they can keep the public in a state of ignorance and isolation is despicable.
Anonymous stands for people who have gotten used to free speech, and who don’t want to give it up. And when you think about it, it is all of us - do you know anyone who is a member on an online forum? Who uses wikipedia, who reads news sites or who googles words when they don’t know how to spell them properly? It’s the entire world - the whole goddamn world! - right at your fingertips, and the scariest thing about that is that our generation is going to be the first generation of informed, mobilised global citizens, who know that we are powerful, and that we’re not alone. That is what Anonymous is. The hackers and activists who take down sites and protest are people who have grown up on the internet, too, and most likely learned their skills through it: they are weapons of free speech. Now there’s something to think on.
I’ll sum this up real simple: the internet is our Library of Alexandria. And if there was some way, any way, that I could help stop the Romans from burning that fucker down? Well then you’d better throw a Guy Fawkes mask over this way and call me anonymous too.

apriki:

I think it’s amazing, tbqh. I think that Anonymous embodies everything the power of the internet can be and turns it into a weapon for defending free speech, which is, at the end of the day, censorship of anything on the web is aiming to destroy.

Consider this: we are the first generation to truly have been raised in a digital world. For most of us, there is nothing scary or confusing or uncomfortable about sitting down in front of a computer and googling something or just making our way around the internet. Our view and our impact aren’t limited to our local community or area - thanks to the internet, our social circles and our perspective is worldwide. Have you ever spoken to someone you’ve never met, who lives half a world away? That’s the power of the internet: a global communication system that lets you connect instantly to people whose experiences and lives are drastically different to yours.

In the 1450’s, the Gutenberg press was created, and it changed the world because for the first time ever, widespread populations were learning to read and to understand, and began interpreting the Bible for themselves instead of listening to the church. This lead to schisms in Christianity that are still fought over today - all because the masses, for the first time, had the change to become informed for themselves. Do you know what the Internet gives us? It gives us knowledge, and that will get you further than anything else in the world. God, how could you not want to know? How could you not want to be on the web everyday, learning and understanding? Everything is accesible to you at the click of a button, and that’s not only revolutionary, it’s neccessary. 

People should not be censored by their governments. They should be given the choice and the opportunity to educate themselves, and the internet gives them that chance. People should be able to choose what media they’re going to consume, and when, and how; and not feel ostracised because of their geographic location, because the internet eliminates that factor. Internet users know this. File sharing sites know this. For some reason, governments and corporate businesses seem to have missed the message.

The fact remains that the entertainment industry is centered on the United States, and the rest of the world is secondary to that. In most countries there is no Netflix or direct streaming of television shows (and where they are present the shows usually have a delay by one or two seasons from when they air in America), and the shows that air are a limited and controlled sampling of the full scope. There is no fast, cheap and reliable way to download or stream these shows from websites or programs (attempting to stream from sites like ABC or Hulu outside of the US ends with a “this video is not available in your country” notice) - if you are not in the US, there is basically nothing for you. Unless, of course, you torrent or download - the companies who own television shows don’t think they’re going to make a profit in your country, so you’d probably never get to see them otherwise.

Basically, the entertainment industry is constantly and repeatedly telling me that my worth as a consumer is less than an American because I am not as geographically desirable. Even on the internet - which transcends national boundaries - I am not allowed to view things because I am not an American. Do you know what I think about that? I think it’s bullshit. 

I think that everyone, everywhere is an equal consumer. I think that we should all be given the choice to engage with media, to educate ourselves, to learn and experience what the world has to offer us. I think that the government won’t let me do that, and corporate industry doesn’t want me to do that, and that the internet is quite possibly one of the only places in the world where free speech is given free reign, and that’s beautiful.

We don’t vote in entertainment companies or business CEO’s, and yet they decide what we hear, what we see, what’s good for us and what isn’t. We don’t decide what ads we see or how people are represented in them; we aren’t given a say in the fact that the make up industries of the world make a profit out of attempting to keep women in a state of shame over their own bodies, or that people of color and non-heterosexuals and those who do not adhere to the gender binary are barely represented at all in any media. I think that all these groups - that all groups, everywhere - have an opportunity to gather and connect and learn on the internet. And I think the fact that governments and industries want to stamp that out so they can keep the public in a state of ignorance and isolation is despicable.

Anonymous stands for people who have gotten used to free speech, and who don’t want to give it up. And when you think about it, it is all of us - do you know anyone who is a member on an online forum? Who uses wikipedia, who reads news sites or who googles words when they don’t know how to spell them properly? It’s the entire world - the whole goddamn world! - right at your fingertips, and the scariest thing about that is that our generation is going to be the first generation of informed, mobilised global citizens, who know that we are powerful, and that we’re not alone. That is what Anonymous is. The hackers and activists who take down sites and protest are people who have grown up on the internet, too, and most likely learned their skills through it: they are weapons of free speech. Now there’s something to think on.

I’ll sum this up real simple: the internet is our Library of Alexandria. And if there was some way, any way, that I could help stop the Romans from burning that fucker down? Well then you’d better throw a Guy Fawkes mask over this way and call me anonymous too.